Using Waste Heat to Reduce Emissions 

“As a result of the Bigstone Plant Waste Heat Recovery Unit, we have lowered our fuel consumption, cut back on costs and reduced CO2 emissions”

Talisman Energy Inc. has introduced a Waste Heat Recovery Unit (WHRU) to its Bigstone Plant near Fox Creek, Alberta. 

The Bigstone Plant Waste Heat Recovery Unit was designed to transfer waste heat produced by gas turbine compressors and use it to heat liquids required to process gas.  By transferring and re-using the waste heat, Talisman is able to reduce its fuel gas consumption. 

Talisman Energy's Bigstone Plant near Edson, AlbertaTalisman Energy's Bigstone Plant Waste Heat
Recovery Unit near Edson, Alberta

On average, the fuel gas savings from the WHRU are expected to be 300 thousand cubic feet per day, a 15% reduction and the project will reduce CO2 emissions by about 4,500 tonnes/year.

“As a result of the Bigstone Plant Waste Heat Recovery Unit, we have lowered our fuel consumption, cut back on costs and reduced CO2 emissions,” said Andrew Cattran, Manager, Edson Field.  “Talisman has a history of finding innovative ways to improve efficiencies and the Bigstone project demonstrates our ongoing commitment to reduce fuel consumption and to minimize our environmental footprint”

In 2004, Talisman invested $21 million to build Alberta’s first Sour Gas plant cogeneration facility at the Edson Gas plant.  The Edson cogeneration facility reduces CO2 emissions by 23 000 tons per year, lowers the plant’s fuel gas consumption by one million cubic feet per day and produces 10 MW of electrical power.  It also improves plant reliability by allowing continued operations during interruptions on the main power grid. 

Talisman is currently looking at further ways to utilize waste heat and extend the project to other compressor units. The design and concept for the Bigstone WHRU was devised by a group of Talisman engineers and technologists in 2006.

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