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The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP)

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in September, 2007. The Declaration is a comprehensive international instrument, which consists of 46 articles that relate to the rights of Indigenous peoples. The document establishes a universal framework to enshrine the individual and collective rights that constitute the minimum standards to protect the rights of Indigenous peoples and to contribute to their survival, dignity, and wellbeing.

Canada’s Response to UNDRIP

In 2010, Canada’s federal government endorsed UNDRIP and in 2016, officially adopted it and stated its intention to implement UNDRIP in accordance with the Canadian Constitution. In December 2020, the federal government introduced Bill C-15, The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, which received Royal Assent in June, 2021. Bill C-15 requires the federal government to prepare an action plan to achieve the objectives of UNDRIP by June 21, 2023.

WHY DO C-15 AND UNDRIP MATTER?

UNDRIP is the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. It is widely supported for its promotion of the rights of Indigenous peoples around the world. But there are concerns over Bill C-15, a federal bill proposing to make UNDRIP a part of Canadian law. This video by the Indigenous Resource Network explains what UNDRIP and Bill C-15 are, and some of the concerns regarding what Bill C-15 could mean for Indigenous participation in natural resource development.

CAPP’S RESPONSE TO UNDRIP

CAPP supports an approach to implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in Canada that preserves and enhances opportunities for reconciliation. In 2016, CAPP publicly endorsed the principles of UNDRIP as an important framework for reconciliation, and during the 2021 parliamentary debates on Bill-C-15 identified important considerations for UNDRIP implementation.

Download CAPP’s UNDRIP Discussion Paper

Download CAPP’s UNDRIP Submission to the House of Commons

CAPP supports the co-development of an action plan with Indigenous peoples to implement UNDRIP in Canada. CAPP seeks the opportunity to participate in this dialogue where appropriate to the oil and natural gas industry. Done well, the process can be a powerful tool to build alignment, understand mutual expectations and close existing, significant socio-economic gaps for Indigenous peoples.

PODCAST: WHY INDIGENOUS SUPPORT OF NATURAL RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT IS STRONGER THAN YOU THINK

65% of Indigenous peoples support natural resource development: we chat with John Desjarlais and JP Gladu of the Indigenous Resource Network about what that means.

See all Indigenous Engagement

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